Favorite Short Stories of 2016


Quantcast



This almost seems impossible, but I read around 150 short stories in 2016. It’s my first year keeping track, and I was really surprised by how many I read! I read short stories in a variety of formats: in collections by individual authors; in edited collections with multiple authors; I have a subscription to Uncanny Magazine; and I read random stories recommended on Twitter published in a variety of free, online platforms. I switch back and forth between recently released short stories and older stories, and keep two separate folders to keep track of the ones I want to read.

So here are the top 10 short stories I read in 2016. Just like last week in my best novels of 2016 post, these are in no particular order. I’ve linked to the stories whenever they’re free to read online, so happy reading!

  1. “Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang. Published in 1998 in Stories of Your Life and Others. This novelette asks, In what ways can language shape cognitive functions? Oh, the tears snuck up on me in this one. This is what the movie Arrival is based on, which I will eventually see, especially after loving the story so much.

 

 

  1. The Sleeper and the Spindle” by Neil Gaiman. The illustrated edition I read first was published in 2014, but it’s been published multiple times. It’s a wonderful novelette that turns the passive Snow White and Sleeping Beauty princesses into not so passive agents of their own futures. And the illustrations are so lovely — definitely worth buying the special edition.

 

  1. “The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains” by Neil Gaiman. Okay, so I really love Gaiman’s short stories, so he has 2 on this list. The edition I read of this one is in Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances (full review) published in 2015 (“Sleeper in the Spindle” appears in this collection as well), but it’s also been published multiple times. In this novelette, a dwarf asks a farmer to show him the way to a cave in the mountains that holds gold, gold that comes at a price. I broke out in goosebumps when I realized what was going on.

 

  1. “Midnight Hour” by Mary Robinette Kowal. Published in 2015 in Uncanny Magazine Issue 5. The kingdom is cursed, but some curses are ultimately good. Can a nameless queen distract a questing prince in order to keep her kingdom’s curse? Mary Robinette Kowal always writes great short stories, and this is my favorite of hers (so far).

 

 

  1. “The Gorgon in the Cupboard” by Patricia McKillip. Read in Dreams of Distant Shores (full review), published in 2016 though the novelette is a reprint. A painter struggles with his craft and obsesses over another painter’s model when one day he paints the model’s lips on an unfinished painting of another model, a model who earlier disappeared and he’s been searching for ever since. And the painted lips speak. A lovely story reminiscent of Charles De Lint.

 

  1. “Tear Tracks” Malka Older. Published on Tor.com in 2015. Flur is chosen as an ambassador to Earth’s first alien contact on another planet. She has only a few hours to convince the aliens to sign a treaty, but the lack of similar social cues throws her off. Yep, you guessed it, I cried. This was the first thing I’d ever read by this author, but since then she’s published her first novel — Infomocracy — which I hope to read soon.

 

  1. The Creeping Women” by Christopher Barzak. Published in Uncanny Magazine Issue 8 in 2016. A retelling of “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman! I’m pretty sure I don’t need to say anything else.

 

 

 

  1. “Red as Blood and White as Bone” by Theodora Goss. Published on Tor.com in 2016. A kitchen maid dreams of being in a fairy tale, and when one night a woman collapses at the kitchen door, she knows a princess has come in disguise. Such a perfect short story.

 

 

  1. “The Animal Women” by Alix E. Harrow. Published in Strange Horizons in 2015. A little girl in the 1960s south makes friends with a group of mostly ‘colored’ women that live near her home — and occasionally she captures pictures of them that show something more than human about them. Also a lovely novelette.

 

  1. “Cookie Jar” by Stephen King. Published in VQR in 2016. A 13-year-old goes to interview his 90-year-old great grandfather, who tells him a strange story about another dimension and an endless supply of cookies. While I no longer keep up with Stephen King’s books, I still read his short stories periodically. He really is an excellent writer.

Runners up

What were your favorite short stories?

Reading Railroad: November’s Reading


Quantcast



Everything I read in November. I’m a week late posting this, but I wanted to post about holiday gift ideas first (which you can find here and here).

Novels

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. Published in 2008. Epic Fantasy. This novel probably needs no introduction, and is easily the book that’s been recommended to me more than any other. An innkeeper, Kvothe, who’s not really an innkeeper but a powerful magician who’s done…something…agrees to tell his story for the chronicler to write down. The Name of the Wind is day one of his life story, where you find out about his parents, his time as a beggar, and his admittance in the university where he starts learning magic. At the university he makes friends, enemies, and there’s one lady that haunts him. Overall, a well-written fantasy. I’ll be reading the rest of the series. My full review is on Goodreads. 4/5

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden. Will be published in January 2017. Adult historical fairytale fantasy. From the day Vasilisa Petrovna is born, in the heart of winter, her family knows she’s different, though they still love her with a fierce devotion. Her mother dies during childbirth, and her father travels to Moscow where he finds a new wife, Anna, a relation of his previous wife, who like Vasilisa has the sight. Both can see chyerti and domovoi — guardian spirits and creatures from Russian folklore — though when Anna sees them she sees demons, while Vasya sees them for what they truly are. A fun novel given to me to read by Netgalley for an honest review. The full review will be posted here in January. 4/5

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire. Published in April 2016. YA fantasy. A door appears — a tiny door tucked into the porch railing that shrinks you when you open it, a rainbow door that leads you to a nonsense, rainbow world, a door that leads you to the land where Death is lord. But this isn’t a story about those portal worlds, rather about what happens after the portal world becomes your home and then spits you back out into reality, where your parents think you’ve been kidnapped for months or years, and their home can never be yours again. These teens are sent to Eleanor’s Home for Wayward Children. Everyone in the home has been through a portal world, and everyone wishes to find their door again and return. Nancy is a new student whose portal world was where Death reigned. This could be a new home for Nancy, but when a student dies, and then another, her new home is threatened, unless the students can figure out what’s happening. A fun read, and first in a series. I’ll be reading the others. I posted a slightly longer review on Goodreads. 4/5

Cinder by Marissa Meyer. Published in 2012. YA science fiction and fairytale retelling of “Cinderella.” Cinder is a cyborg in New Beijing, but cyborgs aren’t considered ‘humans’ by many. An incurable plague is killing many in New Beijing and around the world, and cyborgs are often taken to be tested on. But so far Cinder’s managed to stay out of the way of the doctors. Cinder’s stepmother treats her cruelly, as does one of her stepsisters, but the other stepsister is kind, and Cinder has an android who’s her friend. She works as a mechanic, and when the handsome Prince Kai brings his broken android to her to fix, and the evil Lunar Queen comes to try to manipulate Kai into marriage, everything starts to change for Cinder. A fun though predictable YA. First in a series. My full review is on Goodreads. 3.5/5

The Seventh Bride by T. Kingfisher. Published in 2014. YA fantasy and fairytale retelling of “Bluebeard.” When a wealthy magician proposes to 15-yr-old Rhea, a poor miller’s daughter, her family has no recourse but to accept. But she’s not his first wife. How will Rhea free herself from the marriage? How about the other wives? A fun, quick read. 4/5

 

 

The Wolf Road by Beth Lewis. Published in June 2016. Adult post-apocalyptic thriller. When Elka’s seven, a super storm hits and kills her grandmother. Years earlier her parents left to search for gold, so now Elka’s in the woods by herself. She sets out on her own and is eventually found by a man she calls Trapper, and Daddy in her head. He raises her, teaches her wood lore and how to hunt. She loves him and he seems to love her in his own way. The one rule is she’s never to speak of him to anyone else. When she’s seventeen, she goes to the closest town to pick up some supplies, and sees a wanted poster with the face of Trapper on it. He’s wanted for multiple murders, and it’s not until then that she realizes he’s a serial killer. Magistrate Lyon is after him for killing her son, and when she sees Elka’s reaction to the wanted poster, she realizes Elka knows the man. Elka escapes into the woods on a mission to find her long lost parents, but two hunt her — Magistrate Lyon and Trapper. Very exciting read. You can read my Goodreads review here, but I may post a review of it on this blog soon. 4/5

Short Stories

I link to the free stories when they’re available.

The Contemporary Foxwife by Yoon Ha Lee. Published in 2014 in Clarkesworld Magazine. On a faraway planet, there’s a knock at the door, and it’s a foxwife. Great use of folklore in a sci-fi setting. 4/5

 

 

 

“Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang, read in Stories of Your Life and Others. Originally published in 1998. This is the short story the film Arrival is based on. I originally read this in preparation for watching the movie, but I’ve been so busy I haven’t had a chance to see it yet. However, the story is fantastic. It asks, In what ways can language shape cognitive functions? When aliens come to earth, linguist Louise Banks is asked to join a team of researchers to decipher their language, but as she learns their language, the way she perceives the world around her changes too. This one really snuck up on me. One moment I was casually reading, the next I had tears in my eyes. I can’t wait to see the movie! 5/5

Let the Century to Sit Unmoved by Sarah Pinsker. Published in Strange Horizons in May 2016. There’s a pond in a small town and sometimes the people who jump in don’t come out. Yet the main character jumps anyway, as many teens do. I liked the concept and voice, but it was more like world building than an actual story. 3/5

No Matter Which Way We Turned by Brian Evenson. Published in People Holding in May 2016. An evocative flash fiction piece about a girl with no front. 4/5

 

Happy reading in the month to come!

Reading Railroad: October’s Reading


Quantcast



Everything I read in October. I made up for the slow reading in September last month!

Novels

Except the Queen by Jane Yolen and Midori Snyder. Published in 2010. Adult fantasy. Two fae sisters, Meteora and Serana, happen upon the Fairy Queen with a mortal man and their child tucked away safe in the grass. They flee the queen’s wrath, but when one makes a gossipy mistake, the queen finds them and curses them to live apart in the mortal realm as two old women. For those who love fae and fairy. My full review is on Goodreads. 4/5

 

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter. Published in September 2016. YA fantasy. It’s current day Brooklyn, but not quite the same Brooklyn we know, for the nights feel endless and stretch on and on and on, and there’s a convenience store chain called Babs Yagg, if you dare to go in it. Anyone ‘caught’ stealing has their head cut off. Vassa’s not a normal 16-yr-old. She carries with her a secret magical doll, Erg, that her mother gave her. Arriving at the store, Vassa is tricked by Babs Yaggs into working there for 3 nights. She knows she’s doomed to have her head cut off, but maybe with Erg’s help she can make it out. I didn’t quite believe the characters, though it’s a creative idea. My full review is on Goodreads. Thanks to Tor/Forge and Goodreads First Reads for the free copy in exchange for an honest review. 3/5

Faithful by Alice Hoffman. Published in November 2016. Contemporary fiction. It’s release day for this one! You can read my full review on this blog. Thanks to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review. 4/5

 

 

Rumpled by Lacey Louwagie. Published in 2014. Fantasy. A quick read — novella-length — that explores an alternate version of Rumpelstiltskin. I’m in a Goodreads book group with Lacey, so I wanted to give her retelling a read. 4/5

 

 

Bohemian Gospel by Dana Chamblee Carpenter. Published in 2015. Historical fiction. Mouse lives in a convent, but she’s not allowed to attend church or to be baptized. People whisper she’s a witch, but her surrogate father Father Lucas assures her she’s a child of God. But she knows she’s different. She can see people’s souls, and when she looks for her own, she sees nothing. She also has unusual healing powers, which come in handy when the young King Ottakar winds up at the abbey after being shot by an arrow. She saves him, and in return he makes her his ward, and takes her with him to Prague. Those who love historical fiction and magic should give this a try. I work with Dana, so I’m so glad I enjoyed this. My full review is on Goodreads. I may post it on this blog at some point. 4/5

Lilith by George MacDonald. Published in 1895. Fantasy. While I was expecting a Christian fantasy, I wasn’t expecting it to be an allegory. Some people may love religious allegories; I’m not a fan. I can definitely see how MacDonald inspired C.S. Lewis. 2/5

 

 

The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury. Published in 1972. MG light horror. Through the eyes of a group of trick-or-treating boys, Bradbury explores the Halloween traditions of several cultures, and the ending is perfect. While written for middle grade readers, it was fun for me to read too. Bradbury’s descriptions of Fall and Halloween are evocative; you can really tell he loved this time of year. This is my favorite Ray Bradbury so far! Perfect Halloween read. 4/5

Short Story Collections

The Rose and The Beast: Fairy Tales Retold by Francesca Lia Block. Published in 2001. YA short stories. While most of these stories are terribly depressing (dealing with sexual violence), they also have a jerky, happy quality — a tone that resembles teenage girl talk. It reminded me a bit of Kate Bernheimer. If you like your fairytale retellings to add details and turn archetypes into 3 dimensional characters, this isn’t a collection you’ll enjoy. But if you like retellings that keep the peculiar flatness of the originals, coupled with a modern setting and disturbing content, then this is right up your alley. I read this in a single sitting, so it’s a fast read. My full review is on Goodreads. 3.5/5

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz. Published in 1989. MG horror stories. I listened to this on youtube the day before Halloween, and remembered almost all of the stories! Brought me right back to childhood. Can you believe that no one in one of my college classes had ever heard of it!? 4/5

 

Nonfiction

Steering the Craft by Ursula Le Guin. Published in 1998. 10 craft exercises in 10 chapters. These craft exercises help break down the elements of writing so the writer is more conscious of these elements as they’re writing. I did all 10 exercises, and feel more conscious of the physicality of my writing than I did before. Another plus to these exercises are that they can be done again and again. While you won’t have a short story ready for submission after reading this, you will have the skills (or improved skills) to write one. My full review is on Goodreads. 4/5

Short Stories

These are all free to read online by clicking on the links.

The Pigeon Summer by Brit Mandelo. Published in May 2016 by Tor.com. J.’s best friend and soulmate has died, and si doesn’t know how to continue. Plus, si believes si’s being haunted. Interesting use of gender-queer pronouns. I liked that about it, and J.’s struggle with grief felt very real. I wish the speculative element had been emphasized more. 3.5/5

 

The Cleverest Daughter by Sarah Marshall. Published in 2016 by One Throne Magazine. A story of abuse combined with a lovely retelling of East of the Sun, West of the Moon. It took a few readings of the beginning for me to figure out who was saying what, but I enjoyed it. 4/5

The Magician and Laplace’s Demon by Tom Crosshill. Published in 2014 by Clarkesworld Magazine. An AI meets its match in a magician, but it’s not going to let a magician outsmart it. Interesting concept and well-written. 4/5

 

 

Wine by Yoon Ha Lee. Published in 2014 by Clarkesworld Magazine. To save their planet a decision is made, but the cost is too much for some. Interesting character development — would like to read more in this world. 4/5

 

 

Happy reading in the month to come!

Reading Railroad: July’s Reading


Quantcast



Everything I read in July. 

Novels

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin. Published in 2009. A pretty darn adorable middle grade novel that’s also illustrated by the author. It would be perfect for reading aloud to 6-10 year olds, but it’s also a lot of fun to read as an adult. It’s based on Chinese folklore, and tells of how Minli travels to find the Man on the Moon to discover how to make her family a fortune, and on her way rescues a dragon, frees a talking goldfish, and meets a king, among other adventures. Read my full review on Goodreads. 4.5/5

 

The Book of Heaven by Patricia Storace. Published in 2014. This book has a wonderful premise — feminist retellings of women in the bible, yet, if it weren’t for the synopsis, I would have no idea that these tales were from the Bible. Also, the 4 parts lack development, though there is some interesting and well written stuff. Read my full review on Goodreads. 2.5/5

 

Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler. Published in 1993. What a page-turner! It’s a post apocalyptic novel about a minister’s daughter, Lauren, who creates a religion and decides that surviving is more important than prayer. I’m surprised more people haven’t read this, with survivalism being such a hot theme. It’s such a compulsive read, both thought-provoking and energetic. Read my full review on Goodreads. 4.5/5

 

Someplace to Be Flying by Charles de Lint. Published in 1998. According to some Native American mythology, the world began when Raven stirred his pot, pulling out the earth, the sky, and the animal people. In Newford, the animal people still walk the earth. And some humans have animal people blood running through their veins. A complex urban fantasy. Note that while this is book 5 in the Newford series, they can be read in any order. Read my full review on Goodreads. 4/5

 

Summerlong by Peter S. Beagle. Will be published in September 2016. What happens when the mythic intersects with the mundane? It changes everything, of course. Full review coming soon.

 

 

 

Nonfiction and Other

Modern Life by Matthea Harvey. Published in 2007. Poetry collection. The poems in this collection were hit and miss for me. They’re much more, well, modern than I’m used to, lacking the nostalgia (both in terms of form and content) of most collections I read. Obviously, given the title, that was Harvey’s intent, but honestly, a poem about ham flowers? (Look it up if you don’t know.) But there were some really intriguing poems in here as well. Harvey is certainly an inventive writer, and I’d read more from her despite feeling mostly iffy by the collection. Read my full review on Goodreads.  3/5

 

Short Stories and Collections

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman. Published in 2015. Wonderful novelette that turns the passive Snow White and Sleeping Beauty into not so passive agents of their own futures. Chris Riddell does the artwork, and it is lovely. 5/5

 

 

Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances by Neil Gaiman. Published in 2015. Short story and poetry collection that’s full of the creepy and unsettling, but also some fantastic characters. It would make a great entry point for those unfamiliar with Neil Gaiman. For a more detailed review discussing favorite stories, check out my Goodreads review. I may post a more detailed review on this blog as well. 4/5

 

Uncanny Magazine Issue 11. Published in July 2016. Usually I notice a thread between stories in Uncanny’s issues, but I didn’t notice one this time around. My favorite pieces were: “Travels with the Snow Queen” by Kelly Link, a popular fairytale retelling I’ve read many times; “So you want to run a podcast” by Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky, an essay about podcasting; and an unsettling poem about witches and neighbors by Jessica Wick called “Good neighbors”. This may be my least favorite issue, but I still enjoyed reading it. Read my full review on Goodreads. They’re also running a Kickstarter right now. I highly recommend the magazine. 3/5

 

“Balin” by Chen Qiufan. Read free online in Clarkesworld Magazine. Published April 2016. A father gives his son a paoxiao for his birthday, a creature that mimics others. The boy and his friends abuse the paoxiao, but when the boy becomes an adult he defies his father by becoming a scientist and the paoxiao becomes central to his research. 2.5/5